Fighting Infant Meningitis with Dr. Saad Saad

Dr. Saad Saad is renowned for his work in the area of pediatric surgery. His career spanned 40 years during which he performed the most complex surgeries and developed and patented a specialized infant catheter and the suction endoscope. Dr. Saad spent most of his working years at the K Hovnanian Children’s Hospital but did serve as the family physician for the Saudi Royal family. He is proud of this honor but jokes that he was probably awarded this position by default because he was the only pediatric surgeon certified by the board in the United States and was fluent in Arabic.

 

Dr. Saad Saad is currently retired but continues to contribute to his community and profession. He maintains a working relationship with the Royal College of Surgeons in England and serves as a consultant to a number of other facilities. He supports a certification program so that Saudi Arabia students can obtain their United Kingdom certification in their home country rather than travel abroad. He continues to publish articles that impact pediatrics and recently discussed the impact of infant meningitis in an article in the Medical Daily Times.

 

Meningitis is a dangerous infection that is common among infants under two months of age. Dr. Saad’s article is basically a warning that since this disease can have long term negative impact or be fatal, it is imperative that it is treated immediately. The issue is that meningitis symptoms mimic those of any irritable baby so it is sometimes difficult to detect. Parents should watch for fever, extreme fussiness that seems to last, excessive sleepiness, lack of appetite, or rash. Learn more: https://www.doximity.com/pub/saad-saad-md

 

Meningitis is either bacterial or viral. Babies can contract viral meningitis via contact with adults who have less serious viruses. These illnesses are more serious in infants due to the infant’s immature immune system. Bacterial meningitis is more serious and occurs during pregnancy, childbirth, or labor. Bacterial meningitis is treated with IV antibiotics and, even with immediate treatment, can cause learning disabilities, seizures, hearing problems, and even paralysis. Viral meningitis does not respond to antibiotics but is treated with IV fluids, rest and pain medications.

 

Dr. Saad advises all parents to have their children vaccinated according to the schedule set by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The most important vaccines are the ones specific to measles, mumps, and rubella. Even though vaccinations will not prevent all cases of meningitis, Dr. Saad emphasizes that vaccines are still the best method of prevention.